Journal of Plant Pathology (2001) 83, 45-49

From Pestinfo-Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

A. Myrta, B. Di Terlizzi, D. Boscia, E. Choueiri, M. Gatt, I. Gavriel, K. Çaglayan, C. Varveri, H. Zeramdini, F. Aparicio, V. Pallás and V. Savino (2001)
Serological characterisation of Mediterranean Prunus necrotic ringspot virus isolates
Journal of Plant Pathology 83 (1), 45-49
Abstract: Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), a worldwide pathogen of stone fruits, has many isolates with different biological, serological, and molecular properties. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to a peach isolate of PNRSV were used to investigate the serological variability of PNRSV isolates by DASI-ELISA. Isolates from different stone fruit species and different Mediterranean countries were first identified with polyclonal antisera (PAbs), then 81 isolates were selected from Albania (3), Cyprus (10), Greece (5), Italy (31), Lebanon (6), Malta (5), Tunisia (7), Turkey (7) and Spain (1) and characterised against 10 single MAbs. Six U.S. isolates were included as controls. The virus showed high serological variability as shown by the identification of 34 serogroups, many of which were host-specific (64%) and country-specific (67%).
(The abstract is excluded from the Creative Commons licence and has been copied with permission by the publisher.)
Full text of article
Database assignments for author(s): Arben Myrta, Frederic Aparicio, Elia Choueiri, Vicente Pallas, Christina Varveri, Kadriye Caglayan

Research topic(s) for pests/diseases/weeds:
general biology - morphology - evolution
surveys/sampling/distribution


Pest and/or beneficial records:

Beneficial Pest/Disease/Weed Crop/Product Country Quarant.


Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Albania
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Cyprus
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Greece
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Italy
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Malta
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Spain (continental)
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Turkey
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Tunisia
Prunus necrotic ringspot virus Lebanon