Pathogens and Global Health (2016) 110, 164-172

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Alain Kohl, Emilie Pondeville, Esther Schnettler, Andrea Crisanti, Clelia Supparo, George K. Christophides, Paul J. Kersey, Gareth L. Maslen, Willem Takken, Constantianus J.M. Koenraadt, Clelia F. Oliva, Núria Busquets, F. Xavier Abad, Anna-Bella Failloux, Elena A. Levashina, Anthony J. Wilson, Eva Veronesi, Maëlle Pichard, Sarah Arnaud Marsh and Frédéric Simard (2016)
Advancing vector biology research: a community survey for future directions, research applications and infrastructure requirements
Pathogens and Global Health 110 (4-5), 164-172
Abstract: Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target transmission by the vector. While insecticides are an important part of this arsenal, appearance of resistance mechanisms is increasingly common. Novel tools for genetic manipulation of vectors, use of Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria, and other biological control mechanisms to prevent pathogen transmission have led to promising new intervention strategies, adding to strong interest in vector biology and genetics as well as vector–pathogen interactions. Vector research is therefore at a crucial juncture, and strategic decisions on future research directions and research infrastructure investment should be informed by the research community. A survey initiated by the European Horizon 2020 INFRAVEC-2 consortium set out to canvass priorities in the vector biology research community and to determine key activities that are needed for researchers to efficiently study vectors, vector-pathogen interactions, as well as access the structures and services that allow such activities to be carried out. We summarize the most important findings of the survey which in particular reflect the priorities of researchers in European countries, and which will be of use to stakeholders that include researchers, government, and research organizations.
(The abstract is excluded from the Creative Commons licence and has been copied with permission by the publisher.)
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Database assignments for author(s): Willem Takken

Research topic(s) for pests/diseases/weeds:
review
Research topic(s) for beneficials or antagonists:
review


Pest and/or beneficial records:

Beneficial Pest/Disease/Weed Crop/Product Country Quarant.
Anopheles gambiae
Aedes albopictus
Aedes aegypti
Wolbachia (genus - entomopathogens)