Annual Review of Phytopathology (2016) 54, 347-371

From Pestinfo-Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
People icon1.svgSelected publication
of interest to a wider audience. We would welcome
contributions to the Discussion section (above tab) of this article.
Remember to log in or register (top right corner) before editing pages.
Massimo Turina, Richard Kormelink and Renato O. Resende (2016)
Resistance to tospoviruses in vegetable crops: Epidemiological and molecular aspects
Annual Review of Phytopathology 54, 347-371
Abstract: During the past three decades, the economic impact of tospoviruses has increased, causing high yield losses in a variety of crops and ornamentals. Owing to the difficulty in combating thrips vectors with insecticides, the best way to limit/prevent tospovirus-induced diseases involves a management strategy that includes virus resistance. This review briefly presents current tospovirus taxonomy, diversity, molecular biology, and cytopathology as an introduction to a more extensive description of the two main resistance genes employed against tospoviruses: the Sw5 gene in tomato and the Tsw in pepper. Natural and experimental resistance-breaking (RB) isolates allowed the identification of the viral avirulence protein triggering each of the two resistance gene products; epidemiology of RB isolates is discussed to reinforce the need for allelic variants and the need to search for new/alternative resistance genes. Ongoing efforts for alternative resistance strategies are described not only for Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in pepper and tomato but also for other vegetable crops heavily impacted by tospoviruses.
(The abstract is excluded from the Creative Commons licence and has been copied with permission by the publisher.)
Link to article at publishers website


Database assignments for author(s): Massimo Turina

Research topic(s) for pests/diseases/weeds:
resistance/tolerance/defence of host


Pest and/or beneficial records:

Beneficial Pest/Disease/Weed Crop/Product Country Quarant.
Tomato spotted wilt virus Green pepper/chilli (Capsicum)